kateoplis:

imageoscillite:

jhnbrssndn:

Allegedly the first appearance by “The Led Zeppelin” on British TV, 1970. Weird.

"Nationwide" was a teatime (6pm) current affairs show that ran on the BBC from 1969 to 1983.  

John Bonham Robert Plant TV Interview

"Beatles are out. The Led Zeppelin is in.”

"It’s not what you are. It’s what you’re playing."

(Source: youtube.com)

(Reblogged from kateoplis)

CitiBikes are a Pain in the Ass (by caseyneistat)

More Big Data!!

Among the guests at the fabled Bilderberg meeting, held this weekend just outside London, are the top brass of Google, Amazon and Microsoft. How appropriate they should be there, alongside luminaries of the US political and military establishment. For this was the week that seemed to confirm all the old bug-eyed conspiracy theories about governments and corporations colluding to enslave the rest of us

The more you think about it, the more brilliant it is. At first glance, the deftness of securing government funding, which was intended to sustain and encourage marginal businesses, is rather pleasing. The thought of the thousands of small enterprises that could have been nourished and helped to survive by the cash Amazon has swallowed in one tax-cancelling mouthful is challenging and absorbing. It’s the monster that’s made a myriad food parcels into its canapé. But it gets even better. If, for a second, you make the mistake of thinking that giving Amazon handouts might nevertheless help the UK – by incentivising the company to create jobs in Britain even if, for tax purposes, it exists only in Luxembourg – then think again. Because Amazon is the great job-killer. For every job it creates, more than one is destroyed on the high street. It’s the great annihilator of work and yet it’s receiving a job-creation government subsidy. It doesn’t just absorb money that would be better spent creating employment elsewhere, it deploys it to decimate the chances of that employment (via Amazon’s tax arrangements are nothing short of a work of art. Bravo! | Comment is free | The Observer)

The more you think about it, the more brilliant it is. At first glance, the deftness of securing government funding, which was intended to sustain and encourage marginal businesses, is rather pleasing. The thought of the thousands of small enterprises that could have been nourished and helped to survive by the cash Amazon has swallowed in one tax-cancelling mouthful is challenging and absorbing. It’s the monster that’s made a myriad food parcels into its canapé. But it gets even better. If, for a second, you make the mistake of thinking that giving Amazon handouts might nevertheless help the UK – by incentivising the company to create jobs in Britain even if, for tax purposes, it exists only in Luxembourg – then think again. Because Amazon is the great job-killer. For every job it creates, more than one is destroyed on the high street. It’s the great annihilator of work and yet it’s receiving a job-creation government subsidy. It doesn’t just absorb money that would be better spent creating employment elsewhere, it deploys it to decimate the chances of that employment (via Amazon’s tax arrangements are nothing short of a work of art. Bravo! | Comment is free | The Observer)

It’s a mark of this generation’s strange self-regard that people are minded to think particularly of the tech billionaires as having somehow created a new model of business, when the new boss is inevitably similar to the old boss. For all their Prius-driving babyfacery, you know most of them would be sitting down with Pyongyang in a heartbeat if they thought there was a few extra quid in it (via Don’t be fooled by Google’s Prius-driving babyfacery | Marina Hyde | Comment is free | The Guardian)

It’s a mark of this generation’s strange self-regard that people are minded to think particularly of the tech billionaires as having somehow created a new model of business, when the new boss is inevitably similar to the old boss. For all their Prius-driving babyfacery, you know most of them would be sitting down with Pyongyang in a heartbeat if they thought there was a few extra quid in it (via Don’t be fooled by Google’s Prius-driving babyfacery | Marina Hyde | Comment is free | The Guardian)

Particle Pulsator (by benp)

Rockin Michael Jackson life never before!

I applaud the team who envisaged this city/road redevelopment to change human relationships.  I can’t imagine how difficult it must have been to get support and funding.  Fantastic.

Poynton Regenerated (by Martin Cassini)

(Reblogged from kateoplis)
(Reblogged from nickcrocker)